"It's the most won-der-ful time of the year!" Tribeca Film Festival time! Yes, if you can even believe it, the Festival has finally arrived in all of its cinematic glory. Are you keeping an eye on the screenings with limited amounts of tickets left, so you're not left out in the springtime cold? Are you planning on getting there half an hour ahead of time, as you should be? Well then, since you seem to be prepared, let's catch our breath and check out a few other things going on around the web!

First, though, before we stray too far, let me point you in the direction of a few helpful Festival guides:

  • To help get your head around all of what the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival has to offer and how to take advantage of it, Gothamist put together a very helpful guide to all things TFF. 
  • The Huffington Post put together their twenty-nine must-see movies featured in the Tribeca Film Festival, and the list includes When The Garden Was Eden, About Alex, and Five Star.
  • The Daily Beast also put together a great guide for what to look out for during the festival.

Now for our regularly-scheduled link round up: 

  • "The animated series Adventure Time, now entering its sixth season on Cartoon Network, is the kind of cult phenomenon that’s hard to describe without sounding slightly nuts. It’s a post-apocalyptic allegory full of helpful dating tips for teen-agers, or like World of Warcraft as recapped by Carl Jung. It can be enjoyed, at varying levels, by third graders, art historians, and cosplay fans. It’s also the type of show that’s easy to write off as “stoner humor,” which may be why it took me a while to drop the snotty attitude, to open up and admit the truth: Adventure Time is one of the most philosophically risky and, often, emotionally affecting shows on TV." The New Yorker's Emily Nussbaum on the "gorgeous existential funk" of Adventure Time
  • And while we're on the subject: Maria Bustillos spent time with the creators of Adventure Time for The Awl, in order to find how the show came to be, and how it remains so magical. 
  • Tasha Robinson wrote about why American Psycho's ambiguity about whether Patrick Bateman's graphic murders were real or fantasy is more compelling than a definite answer would be.
  • "After days at elementary school, I came home to immersive tutorials on skeptical thought and secular history lessons of the universe, one dinner table conversation at a time." Sasha Sagan wrote beautifully for New York Magazine about the life lessons given to her by her father, the astronomer Carl Sagan. 
  • Earlier this week, NBC announced that the wonderful Maya Rudolph would be hosting a variety show special called The Maya Rudolph Show on Monday, May 19. 
  • Barack Obama's press secretary Jay Carney told students at Georgetown this week that the president's "most substantive, challenging" interview in 2012 came from The Daily Show
  • "I’m usually really good at not breaking. I’ve had a lot of ridiculous interactions on the street and the voice in my head says, 'Don’t break, because this could be really good and you’ll ruin it if you break.' I try to hold on tight, but with that I just — When she said “whertle,” I just couldn’t." Julie Klausner spoke to Billy Eichner about the famous Elena, bringing Billy on the Street to Fuse, and a few game ideas that Fuse was hesitant to accept. 
  • Finally, I'll leave you with a video of a bunch of tiny, magnetically controlled microrobots zooming around a microfactory like a bunch of gross little bugs. Cute!